What Are The Long-Term Effects Of Theft Charges On Someone’s Record?

Theft charges can have a huge long-term impact on somebody’s record. This is because theft is considered a crime of moral turpitude. A crime of moral turpitude is, generally, conduct that is considered contrary to community standards of justice, honesty, or good morals. If you have a conviction for a crime of moral turpitude, then you will have a very difficult time getting a job that deals with money or other people’s property. You need to be very careful that you don’t have any convictions or any sort of record for crimes of moral turpitude.

You want to think extra hard when pleading to a deferred sentence for a theft crime. If you don’t think you will be able to abide by the terms, then they’re going to haul you back into court and put a conviction on your record. You want to be very careful with crimes of moral turpitude because many good jobs involve handling money. You don’t want to eliminate yourself from a wide variety of jobs that could be very beneficial to you. But, if you get a deferred sentence and complete the probationary terms, then you can potentially get that case expunged after it is dismissed.

What Should People Be Aware Of When Facing Theft Charges?

If your case cannot be dismissed, then expect to pay back whatever you took. Once you hire an attorney and you are paying your attorney, make sure you have a job to not only pay your attorney but to pay the restitution. If you have a plea deal, then you will also have to pay fines and court costs. There’s going to be a lot of money involved, so you need to start working right away if you don’t have a job. If you already have one job, then you’ll likely need to get another one so you can have money to start paying things off now and prepare for paying more in the future.

For more information on Long Term Effects Of Having Theft On Record, a free initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (405) 633-3420 today.

Current as of: November 20, 2017